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Wilson
Tasty Nasty
24/08/2018
Digital Audio, CD Jewelcase


Chad Nicefield
(Vocals)
Jason Spencer
(Lead Guitar)
Kyle Landry
(Rhythm Guitar)
Matt Puhy
(Drums)
James Lascu
(Bass)


BiographyDiscographyGallery
A band is stranded in the desert, sitting in the sand next to their van while they watch the last bit of smoke spiral out from under the hood. Their ride is dead. They’re screwed, man. After waiting close to a day for help they hear the roar of an engine barreling down the road. Squinting through the haze they see a limo pulling up—even if it were Satan himself they’d still take the ride. It comes to a stop, the back window rolls down and it’s Macklemore grinning like a madman. "Y’all a band or something? Get in,” he says. The guys shrug and hop in to be met by Sugar Ray and The Offspring waiting for them. Mark McGrath reaches out his hand and says, “So here it comes, stick out your tongue. Take the ride, feel the rush.” That’s the last thing they remember before the fever dream kicks in. That band is Wilson and the culmination of this fever dream is their new album, Tasty Nasty. After almost a decade of global fuckery, Wilson has done the opposite of what every other band seems to do— they stopped taking shit so seriously! In the process of their, “personal awakening” they forged a new path for themselves and their sound by combining their brand of in-your-face rock n roll with the influence of Hip-Hop and all things 90s. Tasty Nasty is fresh, exciting, and most importantly fun! And it all started with a hit of acid. “At the time we were writing songs that were dark and heavy. It was never really something that I wanted to do. I felt like I was turning myself into a symbol I didn’t want to be,” says vocalist Chad Nicefield about Wilson’s darkest point in their career. “We had just come out on the other side of one of those industry cliché situations. You know, where the band gets fucked? We felt hopeless.” Frustrated with their current state of affairs, the band cleaned house and Nicefield took a two-month trip to Asia to clear his head and pursue true happiness. The idea was to find constant stimulation based on things he used to fear—traveling without a GPS, surfing in shark-infested waters and for the first time since high school—experimenting with acid. “While I was over there I wanted to do anything I felt uneasy about—taking life by the balls,” said Nicefield. “So I did acid and I got this perspective that I really never pictured before: ‘Wait a second, I really like being a silly, fun-loving dumbass.’ ”Nicefield’s revelation about his life and his outlook on the band’s music changed everything. “I just kind of realized who we are as people and our DNA was that of a bunch of lovable, silly dudes, that love to make music. The world needs to know that about us. That needs to be transparent in our music. Even if we have to bring our own chairs to the table, we’ll see you when the dinner bell rings!” They began writing a handful of songs for this newly perceived Wilson. Upon hearing what they were up to, their newly hired management suggested a session with producer Scott Stevens and things immediately fell into place. The guys and Scott had a Step Brothers’, “Did we just become best friends?” moment after they finished that first week together. Wilson then asked Scott to produce the album. Now with no worries or inhibitions holding them back, the guys in Wilson embark on a journey through nostalgia and endearing nonsense on eleven brand new tracks. The opening track, “Dumptruck” is a sonic punch to the face as it kicks in with gang vocals chanting, “This shit bumps, this shit fucks, this shit dumps like a dump truck.” Followed by roaring guitar riffs and a chorus that really does “fuck”, the opener is a perfect dose to set your mind up for the next 35 some-odd-minutes. “Wrong Side of History” follows a Bizkit-ish path, leading you straight into the fever. From that moment on you’re on their ride. With hints of the decade that shaped their musical tastes, combined with slick production and big singalong choruses, Tasty Nasty is equal parts self-deprecating and hilarious. This acid is one hell of a drug, as the fever dream truly kicks in, songs like “Like A Baller” “My Hustle” and “Summertime Treat” are there to prove it. If you like getting hit in the face with a soldering iron (everyone has their fetish), you’ll get to feel that Wilson fury on track ten, “House of Fuckery.” But that’s not what this record is about. It’s about looking ahead, not staring in the rearview mirror. And that, my friends, is Tasty Nasty. “We went to find ourselves as humans inside of our music. Our goal was to illustrate that with this album and over the course of 121 days we got it right. That’s Tasty Nasty. We decided on that name due to the perpetual sweet and sour version of the paths that got us to what this record actually is—both lyrically and musically. We wanted to create another world for ourselves and our fans. That’s why the acid exists, and not only do I have a personal connection to it all, but it’s to illustrate you’re taking this trip with us. Shut up and smile, dummy. It’s not supposed to be so serious.”